Rotman School of Management

Main Content

Admissions Tests


After a successful interview, you will be encouraged to complete the final application for admission which includes demonstrating a sound understanding of basic mathematical and analytical skills.

If you do not have an undergraduate degree, or one that is not recognized by the University of Toronto, you are required to write the GMAT or GRE. If you have an undergraduate degree recognized by the University of Toronto, you have a choice between writing the GMAT, GRE, or the Rotman Executive Diagnostic Test (EDT).

A. Writing the Executive MBA Diagnostic Test (EDT)

The Executive MBA Diagnostic Test (EDT) has been introduced as a replacement for the GMAT for candidates who have an undergraduate degree recognized by the University of Toronto. The EDT focuses on the relevant quantitative areas for your Executive MBA curriculum. Its purpose is to ensure that you have a smooth transition into the program.

The test has been designed by test development specialists at the University of Toronto with the support of the Rotman Executive MBA faculty. Soon after writing the EDT, you will receive a feedback form that will help you identify and strengthen any areas of weakness before you begin your studies.

The EDT does not presuppose any specific knowledge of business or other content areas, nor does it measure achievement in any particular subject areas. The test does not measure subjective factors important to academic and career success, such as motivation, creativity, interpersonal skills, emotional intelligence, study skills, or overall success on the job.

What should I expect?

We will test basic arithmetic and algebraic understanding, graphical data interpretation, and logical reasoning.

In addition, we will ask you to write a short memorandum as part of the test to give us an impression of your English-language skills.

We will ask you to show us your train of thought and the logic flow of how you derived the answer. This will help us provide meaningful feedback.

B. Writing the GMAT or GRE

If you have an undergraduate degree recognized by the University of Toronto, you may write the EDT instead of the GMAT. If you choose to write the GMAT, you must achieve a minimum score of 500 or its equivalent on the GRE. Preference will be given to candidates with a score of 550 or higher.

If you do not have an undergraduate degree or one that is recognized by the University of Toronto, you must write the GMAT and achieve a minimum score of 550 or its equivalent on the GRE.

Please note: GMAT or GRE scores are valid for five years after the test date.

Common Questions About Admissions Tests:

Q: Which test should I write?

If you have an undergraduate degree that is recognized by the University of Toronto, you have a choice between writing the GMAT, GRE or the EDT. The EDT requires little, or certainly much less, preparation time that the GMAT or GRE. However, if you are applying to multiple schools, you may prefer to write the GMAT or GRE.
If you do not have an undergraduate degree, or one that is recognized by the University of Toronto, you are not eligible to write the EDT and must write either the GMAT or the GRE.

Q: What is the format of the EDT?

The EDT has three major sections: Algebra and Arithmetic, Graphical Analysis, and Logical Reasoning. All sections require you to show your work -- there are no multiple-choice questions. The logical reasoning section tests your ability to problem solve, not necessarily with mathematical derivations and formulas, but with common sense and intuition. This section provides you with information and asks a series of questions. The passages that are given can vary immensely in content, so it is not the material that is being tested, rather, it is your ability to put the information together, extract relevant facts, and arrive at a conclusion.

Q: How do I prepare?

After your interview, we will provide you with a preparation guide and workbook. We will also give you access to the EDT online portal which features training videos to refresh your memory on concepts you may not have looked at for a while. The workbook will contain sample questions and solutions to give you a quick review of your skill level. Working through the sample questions will help you prepare for the test. Although the sample questions represent the general nature of the test, it is possible that a type of question not illustrated may appear in the test or that material illustrated may not appear.

Q: When do I take the EDT?

Tests are scheduled for individual applicants after the interview stage in the application process.

Please arrive 15 minutes early for your test and bring photo ID for verification. There is no need for you to bring additional materials. We will provide paper, pencil, and a calculator. Please allow three hours to complete the test.

Note: If you are not successful on your first try, you may schedule a time to repeat the test.

Q: How is the EDT graded?

The EDT is scored like a typical university exam. As the assessment requires you to show and explain your answers, these parts are also looked at and get a lot of consideration when assigning a final score. The EDT is unique in that it tests and grades your basic skills, thought processes, and problem-solving skills.

Start your application

Questions?Contact us anytime

Bibian Aguirre

Bibian Aguirre, M.Ed.
Assistant Director,
Recruitment & Admissions
Tel: +1.416.978.4614

What about the math?

You need math skills at the level of Ontario's Grade 12.

That includes some algebra and a basic ability to manipulate and understand numbers. The EMBA admissions team will provide you with training videos, preparation material, and suggestions for tutors.

Why is math so important for managers?

"The environment for managers is more demanding of these skills, not less. Look at what managers have on their plates these days. They have to read financial statements, manage process design and production facilities. The manager’s job functions — production, reporting, analyzing — require more math these days, not less. Even today's autoworkers have to look at computers that calculate means and variances to make sure they're within the limit. It’s always remarkable to me that people are willing to accept the idea that you ought to dumb down the math, but no one says that about the literacy requirement. These days, not only do you have to understand what numbers mean, you have to communicate it to customers and other stakeholders."