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Tanya Talaga on "Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths in a Northern City"

4:45-5:29pm check-in; 5:30pm sharp to 6:30pm book talk and Q&A; 6:30-6:40pm book sale

Event Details

Speaker Series

Date: Tuesday December 12, 2017 | 05:30 PM - 06:30 PM
Speaker(s): Tanya Talaga, Indigenous Issues Reporter, Toronto Star; Recipient, 2017-2018 Atkinson Fellowship in Public Policy (The Canadian Journalism Foundation); and Author
Topic: "Seven Fallen Feathers: Racism, Death, and Hard Truths in a Northern City" (House of Anansi Press, 2017)
Venue: Desautels Hall (Second floor, South Building) | map
Rotman School of Management, U of Toronto,
105 St George Street
Location: Toronto
Cost: $22.95 plus HST per person (includes 1 seat for the talk and 1 paperback copy of "Seven Fallen Feathers")
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BOOK SYNOPSIS: In 1966, twelve-year-old Chanie Wenjack froze to death on the railway tracks after running away from residential school. An inquest was called and four recommendations were made to prevent another tragedy. None of those recommendations were applied. More than a quarter of a century later, from 2000 to 2011, seven Indigenous high school students died in Thunder Bay, Ontario. The seven were hundreds of miles away from their families, forced to leave home and live in a foreign and unwelcoming city. Five were found dead in the rivers surrounding Lake Superior, below a sacred Indigenous site. Jordan Wabasse, a gentle boy and star hockey player, disappeared into the minus twenty degrees Celsius night. The body of celebrated artist Norval Morrisseau’s grandson, Kyle, was pulled from a river, as was Curran Strang’s. Robyn Harper died in her boarding-house hallway and Paul Panacheese inexplicably collapsed on his kitchen floor. Reggie Bushie’s death finally prompted an inquest, seven years after the discovery of Jethro Anderson, the first boy whose body was found in the water.  Using a sweeping narrative focusing on the lives of the students, award-winning investigative journalist Tanya Talaga delves into the history of this small northern city that has come to manifest Canada’s long struggle with human rights violations against Indigenous communities. A portion of each sale of Seven Fallen Feathers will go to the Dennis Franklin Cromarty Memorial Fund, set up in 1994 to financially assist Nishnawbe Aski Nation students’ studies in Thunder Bay and at post-secondary institutions.

BIOGRAPHY: Tanya Talaga has been a journalist at the Toronto Star for twenty years, covering everything from general city news to education, national health care, foreign news, and Indigenous affairs. She has been nominated five times for the Michener Award in public service journalism. In 2013, she was part of a team that won a National Newspaper Award for a year-long project on the Rana Plaza disaster in Bangladesh. In 2015, she was part of a team that won a National Newspaper Award for Gone, a series of stories on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls. She is the 2017–2018 Atkinson Fellow in Public Policy. Talaga is of Polish and Indigenous descent. Her great-grandmother, Liz Gauthier, was a residential school survivor. Her great-grandfather, Russell Bowen, was an Ojibwe trapper and labourer. Her grandmother is a member of Fort William First Nation. Her mother was raised in Raith and Graham, Ontario. Talaga lives in Toronto with her two teenage children.

SESSION HOST: Martin Prosperity Institute

QUESTIONS: events@rotman.utoronto.ca, Megan Murphy (416) 978-6122

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Cancellations received in writing to events@rotman.utoronto.ca 24 hours prior to the event will receive a refund less a $10 administration fee per person. If we do not receive written notice of your cancellation, you will be charged the full amount for this session. Substitutions are always welcome.

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