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Creating a Culture Where Innovation Can Flourish - 21st Annual Rotman Lifelong Learning Conference for Leaders

8:00-8:59am check-in, light breakfast; 9:00am sharp to 12:14pm sessions; 12:15-12:59pm box lunches; 1:00-4:59pm sessions; 5:00-6:00pm drinks reception

Conference Sponsor: Infiniti

Event Details

Speaker Series | Research Discussions | Panel Discussion | Networking Event

Date: Friday May 31, 2019 | 09:00 AM - 05:00 PM
Speaker(s): 5 Keynote Speakers:
Chris Bailey
, Globe and Mail Best-Selling Author, Speaker and Consultant
Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic, Chief Talent Scientist, ManpowerGroup; Professor of Business Psychology, University College London and Columbia University; Associate - Entrepreneurial Finance Lab, Harvard University; Author
Amy Edmondson, Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management, Harvard Business School; Author
Cass Sunstein, Robert Walmsley University Professor, Harvard University Law School and New York Times Best-Selling Author
Amy Webb, Professor of Strategic Foresight, Stern School of Business, NYU; Founder, Future Today Institute; Author

5 Moderators:
Anita Anand
, Professor of Law and J.R. Kimber Chair in Investor Protection and Corporate Governance, Faculty of Law; Cross-Appointed to Rotman School of Management and Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto
Ahmad Ayyub (Rotman MBA ’13), Senior Manager - Corporate Development, Telus Corporation
Brendan Calder, Professor and Entrepreneur-in-Residence, Rotman
Tiziana Casciaro, Jim Fisher Professor of Leadership Development and Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Human Resource Management, Rotman
Dilip Soman, Canada Research Chair in Behavioural Science and Economics and Professor of Marketing, Rotman; Author
Topic: “Creating a Culture Where Innovation Can Flourish”
Venue: Desautels Hall (2nd floor, South Building) | map
Rotman School of Management, U of Toronto,
105 St George Street
Location: Toronto
Cost: $800 per person plus HST; $500 per person for Rotman Executive Program graduates, UofT Alumni and "Rotman Management Magazine" subscribers; $400 per person for employees of non-profit organizations (includes governments, hospitals, universities and colleges); $300 per person for Rotman Alumni (MBA, MFin, PhD, BCom) and current university and college students enrolled outside of Rotman; $175 per person for members of Rotman classes ending in 4, 9, 17, 18 and 19 and current Rotman students, faculty and staff
Register Now

Fees include: all sessions, breakfast, lunch, coffee breaks, drinks reception, hardcover copies of the five books, and the Spring 2019 issue of Rotman Management magazine.

Agenda:

8:00 Check-In, Light Breakfast

9:00 sharp Welcome

9:10 “The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation and Growth” (Wiley, 2018)

Keynote Book Talk by Amy Edmondson, Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management, Harvard Business School; Author

Fireside Chat led by Tiziana Casciaro, Jim Fisher Professor of Leadership Development and Professor of Organizational Behaviour and Human Resource Management, Rotman

Book Synopsis:
Written for leaders and teams, The Fearless Organization is a practical guide for creating cultures where knowledge and innovation flourish because people feel safe to contribute their ideas. While many companies are investing in talent to compete in today’s knowledge economy, the best talent is wasted if people are not able to speak up. The human instinct is to “fit in” and “go along” works against the continuous flow of new ideas, new solutions, and critical thought necessary for companies to stay innovative. While not every idea will hit a home run, an organization’s culture must not suppress, silence, ridicule or intimidate. Based on Edmondson’s 20 years of research, this invaluable book helps companies tackle the people side of the innovation equation to create workplaces that are safe, fearless and empowered to with unbridled ideas. The Fearless Organization offers a step-by-step framework for establishing psychological safety within a team and an organization. It is filled with illustrative scenario-based examples and provides a clear path forward for implementing a culture that thrives on the free expression of ideas and nurturing engagement. The Fearless Organization can give leaders the confidence they need to unleash individual and collective talent and create the type of work environments that helps everyone succeed and their organizations to thrive. Financial Times named it a “Book of the Year” for 2018.

10:30 Coffee Break

10:50 “The Talent Delusion: Why Data, Not Intuition, Is the Key to Unlocking Human Potential” (Piatkus, 2017)

Keynote Book Talk by Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic, Chief Talent Scientist, ManpowerGroup; Professor of Business Psychology, University College London and Columbia University; Associate - Entrepreneurial Finance Lab, Harvard University; Author

Fireside Chat led by Ahmad Ayyub (Rotman MBA ’13), Senior Manager - Corporate Development, Telus Corporation

Book Synopsis:
All organisations have problems, and they nearly always concern people: how to manage them; whom to hire, fire or promote; and how to motivate, develop and retain high potential employees. Psychology, the main science for understanding people, should be a pivotal tool for solving these problems - yet most companies play it by ear, and billions of dollars are wasted on futile interventions to attract and retain the right people for key roles. Bridging the gap between the psychological science of talent and common real-world talent practices, The Talent Delusion aims to educate HR practitioners and leaders on how to measure, predict and manage talent. It will provide readers with data-driven solution to the common problems around employee selection, development and engagement; how to define and evaluate talent; how to detect and inhibit toxic employee behaviours; and how to identify and harness leadership potential.

12:15 Box Lunches

1:00 “How Change Happens” (MIT Press, April 2019)

Keynote Book Talk by Cass Sunstein, Robert Walmsley University Professor, Harvard University Law School and New York Times Best-Selling Author

Fireside Chat led by Dilip Soman, Canada Research Chair in Behavioural Science and Economics and Professor of Marketing, Rotman; Author

Book Synopsis:
How does social change happen? When do social movements take off? Sexual harassment was once something that women had to endure; now a movement has risen up against it. White nationalist sentiments, on the other hand, were largely kept out of mainstream discourse; now there is no shortage of media outlets for them. In this book, with the help of behavioral economics, psychology, and other fields, Sunstein casts a bright new light on how change happens. Sunstein focuses on the crucial role of social norms―and on their frequent collapse. When norms lead people to silence themselves, even an unpopular status quo can persist. Then one day, someone challenges the norm―a child who exclaims that the emperor has no clothes; a woman who says “me too.” Sometimes suppressed outrage is unleashed, and long-standing practices fall. Sometimes change is more gradual, as “nudges” help produce new and different decisions―apps that count calories; texted reminders of deadlines; automatic enrollment in green energy or pension plans. Sunstein explores what kinds of nudges are effective and shows why nudges sometimes give way to bans and mandates. Finally, he considers social divisions, social cascades, and “partyism,” when identification with a political party creates a strong bias against all members of an opposing party―which can both fuel and block social change.

2:15 “The Big Nine: How the Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Could Warp Humanity” (PublicAffairs, Mar. 5, 2019)

Keynote Book Talk by Amy Webb, Professor of Strategic Foresight, Stern School of Business, NYU; Founder, Future Today Institute; Author

Fireside Chat led by Anita Anand, Professor of Law and J.R. Kimber Chair in Investor Protection and Corporate Governance, Faculty of Law; Cross-Appointed to Rotman School of Management and Munk School of Global Affairs and Public Policy, University of Toronto

Book Synopsis:
This book is a call-to-arms about the broken nature of artificial intelligence, and the powerful corporations that are turning the human-machine relationship on its head. We like to think that we are in control of the future of "artificial" intelligence. The reality, though, is that we--the everyday people whose data powers AI--aren't actually in control of anything. When, for example, we speak with Alexa, we contribute that data to a system we can't see and have no input into--one largely free from regulation or oversight. The big nine corporations--Amazon, Google, Facebook, Tencent, Baidu, Alibaba, Microsoft, IBM and Apple--are the new gods of AI and are short-changing our futures to reap immediate financial gain. In this book, Amy Webb reveals the pervasive, invisible ways in which the foundations of AI--the people working on the system, their motivations, the technology itself--is broken. Within our lifetimes, AI will, by design, begin to behave unpredictably, thinking and acting in ways which defy human logic. The big nine corporations may be inadvertently building and enabling vast arrays of intelligent systems that don't share our motivations, desires, or hopes for the future of humanity. Much more than a passionate, human-centered call-to-arms, this book delivers a strategy for changing course, and provides a path for liberating us from algorithmic decision-makers and powerful corporations.

3:30 Refreshment Break

3:45 “Hyperfocus: How To Be More Productive in A World of Distraction” (Random House, 2018)

Keynote Book Talk by Chris Bailey, Globe and Mail Best-Selling Author, Speaker and Consultant

Fireside Chat led by Brendan Calder, Professor and Entrepreneur-in-Residence, Rotman

Book Synopsis:
Throughout his experiments and research, Bailey came across many little-known insights into how we focus (a key element of productivity), including the surprising idea that focus isn't so much a state of heightened awareness (as we'd assume), but a balance between two frames of mind. The most recent neuroscientific research on attention reveals that our brain has two powerful modes that can be unlocked when we use our attention well: a focused mode (hyperfocus), which is the foundation for being highly productive, and a creative mode (scatterfocus), which enables us to connect ideas in novel ways. Hyperfocus helps readers unlock both, so they can concentrate more deeply, think more clearly, and work and live more deliberately. Diving deep into the science and theories about how and why we bring our attention to bear on life's big goals and everyday tasks, Bailey takes his unique approach to productivity to the next level in Hyperfocus, while retaining the approachable voice and perspective that made him a fast favourite.

5:00 Drinks Reception (in Fleck Atrium)

6:00 Bar Closes

Biographies of 5 Keynote Speakers:

Amy C. Edmondson is the Novartis Professor of Leadership and Management at the Harvard Business School, a chair established to support the study of human interactions that lead to the creation of successful enterprises that contribute to the betterment of society. Edmondson has been recognized by the biannual Thinkers50 global ranking of management thinkers in 2011, 2013, 2015 and 2017 and was honored with the Talent Award in 2017. She studies teaming, psychological safety, and leadership, and her articles have been published numerous academic and management outlets, including Administrative Science Quarterly, Academy of Management Journal, Harvard Business Review and California Management Review. Her books – Teaming: How organizations learn, innovate and compete in the knowledge economy (Jossey-Bass, 2012), Teaming to Innovate (Jossey-Bass, 2013) and Extreme Teaming (Emerald, 2017) – explore teamwork in dynamic organizational environments. In Building the future: Big teaming for audacious innovation (Berrett-Koehler, 2016), she examines the challenges and opportunities of teaming across industries to build smart cities. Her new book,The Fearless Organization: Creating Psychological Safety in the Workplace for Learning, Innovation and Growth (Wiley, 2018), offers a practical guide for organizations serious about success in the modern economy. Before her academic career, she was Director of Research at Pecos River Learning Centers, where she worked on transformational change in large companies. In the early 1980s, she worked as Chief Engineer for architect/inventor Buckminster Fuller, and her book A Fuller Explanation: The Synergetic Geometry of R. Buckminster Fuller (Birkauser Boston, 1987) clarifies Fuller's mathematical contributions for a non-technical audience. Edmondson received her PhD in organizational behavior, AM in psychology, and AB in engineering and design from Harvard University.

Tomas Chamorro-Premuzic is the Chief Talent Scientist at ManpowerGroup, a Professor of Business Psychology at University College London and at Columbia University, and an Associate at Harvard's Entrepreneurial Finance Lab. Social media/website info: drtomascp.com, @drtcp

Cass R. Sunstein is currently the Robert Walmsley University Professor at Harvard. From 2009 to 2012, he was Administrator of the White House Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs. He is the founder and director of the Program on Behavioral Economics and Public Policy at Harvard Law School. Mr. Sunstein has testified before congressional committees on many subjects, and he has been involved in constitution-making and law reform activities in a number of nations. Mr. Sunstein is author of many articles and books, including Republic.com (2001), Risk and Reason (2002), Why Societies Need Dissent (2003), The Second Bill of Rights (2004), Laws of Fear: Beyond the Precautionary Principle (2005), Worst-Case Scenarios (2001), Nudge: Improving Decisions about Health, Wealth, and Happiness (with Richard H. Thaler, 2008), Simpler: The Future of Government (2013) and most recently Why Nudge? (2014) and Conspiracy Theories and Other Dangerous Ideas (2014). He is now working on group decision making and various projects on the idea of liberty.

Amy Webb is a quantitative futurist. She is a professor of strategic foresight at the NYU Stern School of Business and the Founder of the Future Today Institute, a leading foresight and strategy firm that helps leaders and their organizations prepare for complex futures. Founded in 2006, the Institute advises Fortune 500 and Global 1000 companies, government agencies, large nonprofits, universities and startups around the world. Amy was named to the Thinkers50 Radar list of the 30 management thinkers most likely to shape the future of how organizations are managed and led and was won the prestigious 2017 Thinkers50 RADAR Award. Amy’s special area of research is artificial intelligence, and she has advised three-star generals, White House leadership and CEOs of some of the world’s largest companies on the future of AI. Amy is the author of three books, including The Signals Are Talking: Why Today’s Fringe Is Tomorrow’s Mainstream (PublicAffairs/ Hachette, December 2016), which explains how to forecast and manage technological change. It is a Washington Post bestseller, was selected as one of Fast Company’s Best Books of 2016, won a 2017 Gold Axiom Medal for the best book about business and technology and was one of Amazon’s best books 2016. Signals has been released in multiple international editions and has been translated into a number of languages. Her bestselling memoir Data, A Love Story (Dutton/ Penguin 2013) is about finding love via algorithms. Her TED talk about Data has been viewed more than 6 million times and has been translated into 32 languages. Data is being adapted as a feature film, which is currently in production. Her upcoming book, The Big Nine: How the Tech Titans and Their Thinking Machines Will Change Humanity—launches on March 5th, 2019 (PublicAffairs/ Hachette). It’s a call-to-arms about the broken nature of artificial intelligence, and the powerful corporations that are turning the human-machine relationship on its head. Amy is a Fellow in the United States-Japan Leadership Program. She was a 2014-15 Visiting Nieman Fellow at Harvard University, where her research received a national Sigma Delta Chi award. Amy was also a Delegate on the former U.S.-Russia Bilateral Presidential Commission, where she worked on the future of technology, media and international diplomacy. Amy writes extensively about artificial intelligence, emerging technology, digital media and the impacts/ opportunities they present. She is the tech columnist and a contributing editor at Inc. Magazine, and she writes a column about the future of technology for The Nikkei (Japan). She regularly contributes to a number of publications all over the world, which include the New York Times, Harvard Business Review, Wired, Fortune, Mother Jones and others. Amy’s future forecasting work has been featured in the New York Times, Harvard Business Review, Wall Street Journal, Fast Company, CNN, NPR, and more. Her research has also been cited in several academic papers. For the past 15 years, Amy has been dedicated to helping inform and shape the future of journalism. She is a member of the accreditation council of the ACEJMC, where she is helping to recalibrate accreditation standards for journalism and communication programs throughout the country. She is chairing a committee to develop a new, international digital certification program. Every year, Amy lectures about the future of media and technology at Harvard University as well as a number of universities worldwide, which have included Institut d'études politiques de Paris, Tokyo University and National University of Kyiv. She was a David Letterman Distinguished Professional Lecturer at Ball State University in 2016. Amy serves on a script consultant for films and shows about artificial intelligence, technology and the future. Most recently, she worked on The First, a new drama on Hulu set in the year 2031 about the first humans to travel to Mars. She is a member of the Academy of Television Arts & Sciences (Interactive Media Peer Group – previous Blue Ribbon Emmy award judge). She previously served on the Board of Directors for the Baltimore Symphony Orchestra. Amy originally attended the Jacobs School of Music to study classical clarinet. She holds a B.A. in political science, game theory and economics from Indiana University and an M.S. from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism. She also earned Nikyu Certification in the Japanese government-administered Language Proficiency Test. In addition, she earned the rank of Shodan (first-degree black belt) in Aikido, but a serious accident during training a few years ago forced her to retire.

Chris Bailey is a productivity author and speaker based out of Kingston, Canada. He speaks to audiences around the world about the ways they can accomplish more every day, and is the author of two books: Hyperfocus, and The Productivity Project. Chris's books have been published in 13 languages. He also writes a somewhat-weekly column about productivity at A Life of Productivity. Chris spends most of his time meditating, reading, writing, drinking large amounts of green tea in one sitting, and researching and experimenting with productivity.

Conference Sponsor:

QUESTIONS: events@rotman.utoronto.ca | Daniel Ellul, 416-978-6119 | Megan Murphy, 416-978-6122


Questions?

416-978- 6119 or 416-978-6122

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