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New Thinking

New ideas and new ways of looking at the world's problems are at the heart of the Rotman School of Management. Take a look at new books and new research from Rotman faculty or watch a video of one of our experts or visitors speak on their work.

Books

Books

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Books
Epinets

Professor Dilip Soman, Anita McGahan & Will Mitchell

 

Epinets: The Epistemic Structure and Dynamics of Social Networks
(Stanford University Press, 2014)

 

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Innovating for the Global South and Inclusive Innovation Agenda

Professor Dilip Soman, Anita McGahan & Will Mitchell

 

Innovating for the Global South: Towards an Inclusive Innovation Agenda
(Rotman-UTP Publishing, 2014)

 

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Network AdvantageProfessor Tim Rowley

 

Nework Advantage
(Jossey-Bass, 2014)

 

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DobsonProfessor Wendy Dobson

 

Partners & Rivals
(Rotman-UTP Press, 2013)

 

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Family WealthProfessor Tom McCullough

 

Family Wealth Management
(WILEY, 2013)

 

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Rotman on Design

 

Rotman on Design
(Rotman-UTP Publishing, 2013)

 

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Playing to WinProfs. Dilip Soman and David Soberman with the Rotman marketing faculty

 

Flux: What Marketing Managers Need to Navigate the New Environment
(Rotman-UTP Publishing, 2013)

 

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Playing to WinA.G. Lafley and Roger Martin

Playing to Win: How Strategy Really Works
(HBR Press, 2013)

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Build, Borrow, or Buy: Solving the Growth DilemmaWill Mitchell

Build, Borrow, or Buy: Solving the Growth Dilemma
(HBR Press, 2012)

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CANADA: What It Is; What It Can BeDean Roger Martin and James Milway

CANADA: What It Is; What It Can Be
(Rotman-UTP Publishing, 2012)

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Rise of the Creative Class--Revisited: 10th Anniversary Edition--Revised and ExpandedProfessor Richard Florida

Rise of the Creative Class--Revisited: 10th Anniversary Edition--Revised and Expanded
(Basic Books, 2012)

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Design Works - How to Tackle Your Toughest Innovation Challenges Through Business DesignHeather Fraser
Co-Founder and Executive Director
Rotman Design Works

Design Works - How to Tackle Your Toughest Innovation Challenges Through Business Design
(Rotman-UTP Publishing, 2012)

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Macrowikinomics: New Solutions for a Connected PlanetAdjunct Prof. Don Tapscott
and Anthony D. Williams

Macrowikinomics: New Solutions for a Connected Planet
(Portfolio, 2012)

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Fixing the Game: Bubbles, Crashes, and What Capitalism Can Learn from the NFLDean Roger Martin

Fixing the Game: Bubbles, Crashes, and What Capitalism Can Learn from the NFL
(Harvard Business Review Press, 2011)

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Gravity Shift: How Asia's New Economic Powerhouses Will Shape the 21st CenturyProfessor Wendy Dobson

Gravity Shift: How Asia's New Economic Powerhouses Will Shape the 21st Century
(Rotman-UTP Publishing, 2009)

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Becoming the Evidence-Based Manager: Making the Science of Management Work for YouProfessor Gary Latham

Becoming the Evidence-Based Manager: Making the Science of Management Work for You
(Davies-Black Publishing, 2009)

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Dia-Minds: Decoding the Mental Habits of Successful ThinkersDean Roger Martin and Professor Mihnea Moldoveanu

Dia-Minds: Decoding the Mental Habits of Successful Thinkers
(Rotman/UTP Publishing, 2009)

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The Design of Business: Why Design Thinking is the Next Competitive AdvantageDean Roger Martin

The Design of Business: Why Design Thinking is the Next Competitive Advantage
(Harvard Business Publishing, 2009)

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Relentless Change: A Casebook for the Study of Canadian Business HistoryProfessor Joe Martin

Relentless Change: A Casebook for the Study
of Canadian Business History

(Rotman/UTP Publishing, 2009)

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The Opposable Mind: How Successful Leaders Win Through Integrative Thinking Dean Roger Martin

Opposable Mind: Winning Through Integrative Thinking
(Harvard Business Press, 2009)

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Who’s Your City: How the Creative Economy is Making Where You Live the Most Important Decision of Your LifeProfessor Richard Florida

Who’s Your City: How the Creative Economy is Making Where You Live the Most Important Decision of Your Life
(Random House Canada, 2008)

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Ideas 2013

Ideas by Year: 2014

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Ideas by Year: 2014

Sarah Kaplan

Professor Sarah Kaplan

The Rise of Gender Capitalism is improving the Financial and Social Return of Investments

Investing with a gender lens can create financial and social impact by constructing a new economic logic that bridges the market logic of financial returns with the feminist logic of women’s equality.

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Jacob Hirsh

Professor Jacob Hirsch

Nation's "personality" influences its environmental stewardship

Countries with higher levels of compassion and openness score better when it comes to environmental sustainability.

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PROFESSORS LU & WANG

Professors Hai Lu and Kevin Wang

Sudden unexplained jumps or drops in a stock's price bode ill for the long run

What should investors make of sudden jumps or drops in stock prices that occur for no apparent reason? The phenomenon is hardly unusual: focusing on extreme positive and negative price shocks, University of Toronto accounting professors find that about half are unaccompanied by earnings surprises or any other news that would account for them.

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Chen-Bo Zhong

Professor Chen-Bo Zhong

Number-crunching could lead to unethical choices, says new study

Calculating the pros and cons of a potential decision is a way of decision-making. But repeated engagement with numbers-focused calculations, especially those involving money, can have unintended negative consequences, including social and moral transgressions.

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Dilip Soman

Professor Dilip Soman

Getting things done: How does changing the way you think about deadlines help you reach your goals?

From doing yard work to finishing up the last few classes required for a college degree, consumers struggle to get things done. According to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research, the way consumers think about deadlines can determine whether or not they start tasks and accomplish their goals. "Our research shows that the way consumers think about the future influences whether they get started on tasks. In particular, if the deadline for a task is categorized as being similar to the present, they are more likely to initiate the task," write Prof. Dilip Soman of the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management and Prof. Yanping Tu of the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business.

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Tiziana Casciaro

Professor Tiziana Casciaro

Networking can make some feel "dirty," new study.

If schmoozing for work leaves you with a certain "ick" factor, that's not just awkwardness you're feeling. Professional networking can create feelings of moral impurity and physical dirtiness, shows a new study. That can hold people back from networking more, reducing career opportunities and lowering job performance, says study co-author Tiziana Casciaro, an associate professor of organizational behaviour and human resource management at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management. The study was co-written with fellow researchers Prof. Francesca Gino of Harvard Business School and Prof. Maryam Kouchaki at Northwestern University's Kellogg School of Management.

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Mikhail (Mike) Simutin

Professor Mikhail Simutin

Extra mutual fund cash a good sign for investors

Mutual fund investors should be cautious about funds holding low amounts of cash, says a researcher from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management. That's because funds with high amounts of cash actually outperform those whose managers keep cash reserves low, by nearly 3 per cent annually, shows the study by Mikhail Simutin, an assistant professor of finance at the Rotman School.

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Chen-Bo Zhong

Professors Chen-Bo Zhong

Number-crunching could lead to unethical choices

Calculating the pros and cons of a potential decision is a way of decision-making. But repeated engagement with numbers-focused calculations, especially those involving money, can have unintended negative consequences, including social and moral transgressions, says new study co-authored by a professor at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management. Based on several experiments, researchers concluded that people in a "calculative mindset" as a result of number-crunching are more likely to analyze non-numerical problems mathematically and not take into account social, moral or interpersonal factors.

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Professors Spike Lee and Norbert Schwarz

Professors Spike Lee & Norbert Schwarz

When it hurts to think we were made for each other.

Psychologists observe that people talk and think about love in apparently limitless ways but underlying such diversity are some common themes that frame how we think about relationships. For example, one popular frame considers love as perfect unity (“made for each other,” “she’s my other half”); in another frame, love is a journey (“look how far we’ve come,” “we’ve been through all these things together”).

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Hai Lu

Professor Hai Lu

Money talks when it comes to acceptability of "sin" companies, study reveals.

Companies who make their money in the “sin” industries such as the tobacco, alcohol and gaming industries typically receive less attention from institutional investors and financial analysts. But new research shows social norms and attitudes towards these types of businesses are subject to compromise when their share price looks to be on the rise.

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Aggrawal + Zhao

Professors Pankaj Aggarwal & Min Zhao

How tall you stand changes how you make decisions says new study.

Sitting in a higher chair could improve your long-term financial planning.You might be more likely to buy serious tomes on the second floor of a bookstore, and to pick up lighter reading from the ground floor or basement. The top level of a shopping mall is where customers might consider acquiring a buyer-assembled, multi-functional piece of furniture, while the lower levels are better for simple, pre-fab products.

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Jacob Hirsh

Professor Jacob Hirsh

Watching Events Together Produces Stronger Emotions says new study.

The 2014 World Cup has captured the attention of billions of viewers around the globe. For a short period of time, the world has collectively watching the same events on a massive scale. New research from the University of Tennessee suggests that it is the shared attention that makes these games so emotionally compelling. In a collaborative effort with researchers from the University of Toronto, University of Tennessee, MIT, Columbia University, and Northwestern University, emotional events were found to be more intense when viewed simultaneously with other group members.

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Walid Hejazi

Professor Walid Hejazi

Benchmarking Study from the University of Toronto’s Rotman School and the Madinah Institute for Leadership and Entrepreneurship Examines Reasons for Poor Economic Outcomes in Islamic World.

The fifty-seven countries that form the Organization for Islamic Cooperation (OIC) account for twenty-three percent of the world’s population, yet less than eleven percent of the world’s GDP. As such, the average levels of income within the Muslim world are less than one half the world’s average.

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Stanford DeVoe

Professor Stanford DeVoe

Like some happiness with that? Rotman study suggests fast food cues hurt ability to savor experiences

Want to be able to smell the roses? You might consider buying into a neighbourhood where there are more sit-down restaurants than fast-food outlets, suggests a new paper from the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management.

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Andrew Ching

Professor Andrew Ching

Technology marketers should take consumer life-cycle into account: new Rotman study

If you want grandpa to start using the bank machine instead of standing in line for the teller, the best way to do it is to tell him to "Act now!" with a limited time offer for a banking card, shows new research.

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Ming Hu

Professor Ming Hu

Range of options, prices brings in the crowdfunding bucks, says Rotman research

It doesn't work in the traditional marketplace, but in the world of crowdfunding, giving consumers options and the choice to pay more for essentially the same product makes sense, new research confirms.

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Sam Maglio

Professor Sam Maglio

Research uncovers new angle on mental distance.

Why does the second hour of a journey seem shorter than the first? According to new research from the University of Toronto, the answer is how we’re physically oriented in space.

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Christopher LiuProfessor Christopher Liu

Location Matters When it Comes to Deal Making says new study from UofT’s Rotman School of Management.

Even six-year-olds know who you sit beside matters, whether you're in first grade or at a high-powered dinner.

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Craig DoidgeProfessor Craig Doidge

Dramatic drop in U.S. IPO activity can't be blamed on tougher regulations

An extensive study of initial public offerings shows dramatic changes in the IPO landscape around the world over the past two decades, including a large decrease in the importance of IPOs in the United States while IPOs became more important in other countries. This drop in U.S. IPOs cannot be explained by stricter regulations enacted after the corporate and accounting scandals in the early part of the 2000s.

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Alison Jing XuProfessor Alison Jing Xu

New research shows the way a room is lit can affect the way you make decisions

The next time you want to turn down the emotional intensity before making an important decision, you may want to dim the lights first. A new study from the University of Toronto shows that human emotion, whether positive or negative, is felt more intensely under bright light.

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Katy DeCellesProfessor Katy DeCelles

"Transformational leadership" curbs bad attitudes towards change, shows rare study of correctional officers.

It's no surprise that a cynical attitude towards the prospect of change makes change harder to implement. But it's important to understand that cynicism happens at an individual and workplace-wide level and both must be addressed to get employee buy-in for change initiatives.

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Min ZhaoProfessor Min Zhao

Price highlighting helps consumers stick to longer-term product preferences, Rotman research reveals

Just when that new gym membership is looking like a mistake, recent marketing research shows that reminding consumers of the price strengthens their purchase choices and leads to long-term satisfaction.

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Ideas for 2014

Ideas by Year: 2013

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Ideas by Year: 2013

Pankaj AggarwalProfessor Pankaj Aggarwal

“Please Feed Me”: The power of putting a human face on social causes.

Companies often put a personal face on products in an attempt to reach a deeper connection with consumers. Now new research in the upcoming edition of Psychological Science shows the same idea can be applied to social causes.

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Julie McCarthyProfessor Julie McCarthy

Study shows calm candidates perform better on tests used to screen job applicants.

A new study published in the Journal of Applied Psychology shows that candidates’ reactions impact their performance on the test and on the job, but don’t change the ability of the tests to reliably predict job performance.

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Nina MazarProfessor Nina Ma┼żar

Recession's after-effects could lead to cheating and workplace theft suggests new study.

When people feel financially deprived, they are more likely to relax their moral standards and transgress to improve their financial situation.
 

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John P. TrougakosProfessor John Trougakos

Freedom and choice key to restorative lunch breaks, says new study.  

Working through lunch might not be as bad as they say, suggests a new paper on work recovery, but only if employees choose that themselves, and don't feel pressured into it.

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Professors Feng Chen & Yue LiProfessors Feng Chen & Yue Li

Keep stricter audit committee standards flexible, argues new study from the University of Toronto.

Independent, financially-literate audit committees lead to higher firm values and less diversion of resources by management, shows a new study by researchers at the University of Toronto. 

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Ping DongPhD Candidate Ping Dong

People prefer products that help them 'save face' in embarrassing moments.

People who are feeling embarrassed are more likely to choose items that hide or 'repair' the face, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

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Professors Ajay Agrawal & Avi GoldfarbProfessors Ajay Agrawal & Avi Goldfarb, PhD Candidate Christian Catalini

Spectacular failures, new opportunities to be expected from equity crowdfunding, says Rotman paper aimed at U.S. policymakers.

Equity crowdfunding is not yet legal, but when it is, experts say to expect a period of "chaos" before those involved learn how to make the most of its benefits and minimize its risks.

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Professor Jennifer BerdahlProfessor Jennifer Berdahl

Caregiving dads treated disrespectfully at work, new study finds.

New studies show that middle-class men who take on non traditional caregiving roles are treated worse at work than men who stick closer to traditional gender norms in the family.

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John Hull and Alan WhiteProfessors John Hull & Alan White

New Research on the Valuation of Over-the Counter Derivatives from University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management.

By some measures the over-the-counter derivatives business is the largest business in the world with over $600 trillion in transactions outstanding. 

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Professor András Tilcsik

Why the Super Bowl's location matters: Local ties still bind corporations in globalized era, says new study on philanthropy. Giving is also affected by natural disasters.

If you're a small charity looking for some corporate largesse, pegging your ask to a big morale-boosting event planned for your community may help seal the deal, suggests a new study on corporate giving.

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Professor David Goldreich

Less is more when it comes to investment choices, says new study.

The best investment portfolios are selected from the widest array of choices, right? Not so, says a new study authored by researchers at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management and the Bank of Canada.

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Professor Geoffrey Leonardelli

Choosing less a form of protection says new study on decision-making.

Imagine you have a choice to make.

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Professors Soman, Mazar & Zhao

Researchers at UofT's Rotman School of Management Publish Guide to Nudging.

A new guide from a team of behaviour economists at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management aims to help practitioners develop effective nudges. Drawing on research on this area of behaviour economics, the guide demonstrates how nudging influences behaviour by changing the way choices are presented in the environment.

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Professor Walid Hejazi

2013 TELUS-Rotman IT Security Study: Canadian enterprises operating with false sense of security.

Toronto - TELUS and the Rotman School of Management at The University of Toronto today released the fifth annual study on Canadian IT Security. Taking a qualitative approach for the first time, the research team interviewed...

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Professor Maria Rotundo

Refocusing important on and off the court, says new study.

If an employee's performance drops in one area, does that mean they're slacking off? It could mean that they've simply shifted and refocused their efforts on a different set of tasks -- a positive sign of adaptability that should be considered in performance evaluations, says a study lead by a researcher at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management.

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Professor Jacob Hirsh

Moments of spirituality can induce liberal attitudes, U of T researchers say.

People become more politically liberal immediately after practicing a spiritual exercise such as meditation, researchers at the University of Toronto have found.

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Susan ChristoffersenProfessor Susan Christofferson

Broker fees from mutual funds affect advice; predict worse performance, new study says.

Brokers are supposed to recommend investments that are in the best interests of their clients.

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Ideas 2012

Ideas by Year: 2012

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Ideas by Year: 2012

Brian ConnellyProfessor Brian Connelly

Want better employees? Get somebody else to rate their personalities, suggests new study. - November 14, 2012

Businesses will get more accurate assessments of potential and current employees if they do away with self-rated personality tests and ask those being assessed to find someone else to rate them, suggest results from a new study.

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Ole-Kristian HopeProfessor Ole-Kristian Hope

Multinational corporations that choose not to disclose geographic earnings are more likely to engage in income-shifting activities, says a study from UofT’s Rotman School. - October 16, 2012

Policy makers, lobby groups and citizens should take note—those who understand corporate tax avoidance behavior will be in a better position to deter it.

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Joshua GansProfessor Joshua Gans

Information Wants to Be Shared. New ebook from Harvard Business Review Press - October 3, 2012

A new ebook from Harvard Business Review Press takes a fresh examination of the economics of information selling in the digital age. What information really wants—what makes it more valuable, useful, and immediate, argues Joshua Gans, is to be shared.

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Nina MazarProfessor Nina Mazar

Honestly? Just sign here – first. Joint study by Rotman researcher shows signature placement curbs cheating - September 13, 2012

Tax collectors and insurance agencies trying to boost honest reporting could improve compliance simply by asking people to sign their forms at the beginning instead of at the end.

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Roger MartinDean Roger Martin

Bringing Science to the Art of Strategy - September 3, 2012

Many managers feel doomed to trade off the futile rigor of ordinary strategic planning for the hit-or-miss insights from more creative processes. In fact, the two can be reconciled to produce novel but realistic strategies.

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Pankaj AggrawalProfessor Pankaj Aggarwal

Not all brand-consumer relationships are created equal - July 10, 2012

The type of relationship that consumers have with a brand makes all the difference to brand evaluation in the face of perceived unfairness says University of Toronto study.

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Professor Jacob Hirsh

Marketing Is More Effective When Targeted to Personality Profiles, says new Rotman Study - May 21, 2012

Advertisers spend enormous amounts of time and money attempting to tailor their advertising campaigns to the needs of different demographic groups. After all, the concerns of first-year college students are going to be different from those of retired professionals. 

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Jennifer BerdahlProfessor Jennifer Berdahl

Dominant East Asians face workplace harassment says study from Rotman School - May 8, 2012

They have been stereotyped as a “model minority.” But when they don’t conform to common racial stereotypes, such as being non-dominant, even people of East Asian descent are “unwelcome and unwanted by their co-workers,” says a new paper from the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management.

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Nicola, LaceteraProfessor Nicola Lacetera

Blood drives do better with incentives, says University of Toronto study - May 2, 2012

It’s called the gift of life. But more people will roll up their sleeves to donate blood if a gift card comes with it.

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Sonia KangProfessor Sonia Kang

Young Children Learn About Prejudice by Instruction, Older Children by Experience, Says Research from the University of Toronto - March 27, 2012

For a 6-year old, one of the most powerful educational tools may be direct instruction, according to new research on how children learn about prejudice.

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Walid HejaziProfessor Walid Hejazi

How do you say global business success? In English, says new Rotman research - March 20, 2012

English continues to reign supreme in international business, and it’s not just because some of the biggest economies speak it.

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Soo Min TohProfessor Soo Min Toh

Cultural “tightness” holds back female leadership – but not always, says University of Toronto study - March 8, 2012

Countries that more strictly uphold their cultural norms are less likely to promote women as leaders – unless those norms support equal opportunity for both sexes, shows a new paper from the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management.

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Stéphane CôtéProfessor Stéphane Côté

Upper class more likely to be scofflaws says new research from UC Berkeley and UofT's Rotman School - February 28, 2012

The upper class has a higher propensity for unethical behavior, being more likely to believe – as did Gordon Gekko in the movie "Wall Street" – that "greed is good," according to a new study from researchers at the University of California, Berkeley and the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management.

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Ming HuProfessor Ming Hu

Is the deal on? Rotman study shows why herd mentality best mode for group buying sites - February 2012

We might like to think we're not influenced by other people. But a new study into group buying mechanisms -- like those used on popular internet websites such as Groupon and LivingSocial -- reveals that telling buyers who come later to the offer how many have already signed up increases the number of purchasers.

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Sanford DeVoeProfessor Sanford DeVoe

Time=Money=Less Happiness, Rotman study finds - February 6, 2012

What does “free time” mean to you? When you’re not at work, do you pass the time -- or spend it? The difference may impact how happy you are.

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Claire TsaiProfessor Claire Tsai

Finding it difficult to make a purchase? Try creating some distance from the problem - February 2012

Consumers who are having trouble making decisions can benefit from creating some psychological—or physical—distance, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research

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Mengze ShiProfessor Mengze Shi

Pro athletes bolster star status through team selection, teammates and career evolution: Study - January 16, 2012

Basketball fans in Cleveland may disagree, but two-time NBA Most Valuable Player Lebron James’ decision to play with a higher-profile Miami Heat team and all-star teammates shows sound marketing and career-management acumen, according to newly-published business school research focused on the evolution and importance of star status for today’s professional athletes.

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Ideas 2011

Ideas by Year: 2011

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Ideas by Year: 2011

Brian GoldenProfessor Brian Golden

Paying physicians more to get more — or to get less - November 30, 2011

“Understanding and accurately predicting the response of physicians to incentives is essential if governments wish to increase the supply of physician services,” says Prof. Brian Golden, who holds the Sandra Rotman Chair in Health Sector Strategy at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management, who wrote the article with Rotman Prof. Doug Hyatt and Rosemary Hannam of the Rotman School's Centre for Health Sector Strategy.

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R. Ramy ElitzurProfessor Ramy Elitzur

How smart managers make dumb decisions and why shareholders encourage them - November 14, 2011

From Enron in the United States to Satyam in India, there are plenty of examples of corporate managers lying about their companies’ earnings and ultimately hurting themselves and the businesses they work for. Why do they do it? A limited capacity to see the whole picture – known as “bounded rationality” -- combined with a faulty ethical compass are two big reasons, shows a new study from the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management.

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Chen-Bo Zhong

Professor Jacob Hirsh, Professor Chen-Bo Zhong

Drunk, powerful, and in the dark: The Paradox of the Disinhibited - October 13, 2011

Power can lead to great acts of altruism, but also corruptive, unethical behavior. Being intoxicated can lead to a first date, or a bar brawl. And the mask of anonymity can encourage one individual to let a stranger know they have toilet paper stuck to their shoe, while another may post salacious photos online. What is the common thread between these three disparate states?

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Lisa KramerProfessor Lisa Kramer

Fall market jitters a SAD thing suggests paper from Rotman School of Management - October 11, 2011

It’s no surprise to researcher Lisa Kramer that financial market dips and crashes typically happen in the fall. Her most recent study, forthcoming in Social Psychological and Personality Science, shows that people who experience seasonal depression shun financial risk-taking during seasons with diminished daylight but are more willing to accept risk in spring and summer.

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Dilip SomanProfessor Dilip Soman

Wanna save? Keep it simple, says paper from the Rotman School of Management - September 26, 2011

If one savings goal is a good thing, two or more should be great, right? Not really. Those who want to save are more apt to keep socking money away and more of it too, if they have just one goal in mind, shows work done in multiple countries by two researchers at the University of Toronto’s Rotman School of Management.

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Lukasz PomorskiProfessor Lukasz Pomorski

Is Bigger Better? Size and Performance in Pension Plan Management - September 12, 2011

The health of the pension system is front page news in countries around the world with an ongoing debate on required contribution rates or minimum retirement ages. An equally relevant issue is how efficiently savings invested in pension funds are managed. A paper written by two professors at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management points to economies of scale in pension funds as a powerful tool to increase the wealth accumulated for retirement.

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Avi GoldfarbProfessor Avi Goldfarb

Online advertising waters down impact of offline ad bans - May 30, 2011

Not allowed to advertise your booze or smokes on a billboard? That's okay. Research shows online advertising works especially well in places with government ad bans.

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David ZweigProfessor David Zweig

Employees don't always share well with others, says new paper exposing "knowledge hiding" - May 16, 2011

Why isn't knowledge transfer happening more often in companies spending money on it? Maybe it's because their staff don't always want to share.

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Stéphane CôtéProfessor Stéphane Côté

Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde: The Two Sides of Emotional Intelligence - April 25, 2011

People often assume that having good emotional intelligence makes you a better person. Not so, say the authors of a study published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Emotional skills can be used for good or for evil—for the betterment of the group or for humiliating your coworkers.

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Nina MazarProfessor Nina Mazar

Greased Palm Psychology: Collectivism and Bribery - April 05, 2011

Bribery is condemned in most cultures; but it is more common in some countries than in others. Is poverty, political instability, or lax regulation to blame? A new study published in an upcoming issue of Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science, suggests a surprising contributor: Collectivism.

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Claire Tsai
Min Zhao

Professor Claire Tsai, Professor Min Zhao

How do consumers estimate a good time? - March 18, 2011

Consumers estimate they'll spend more time enjoying activities when the tasks are broken down into components, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research. But using the same process for an unpleasant event decreases time estimates.

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Ole-Kristian HopeProfessor Ole Kristian Hope

Improving financial reporting in private firms’ interest, new study of emerging markets suggests - March 14, 2011

Improved financial reporting at private firms benefits not only potential outside investors but will help the firm make better business decisions for itself too, says a new study.

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Andrew ChingProfessor Andrew Ching

Speedy generic approval may not benefit consumers as much as expected - February 08, 2011

Faster approval times for generic drugs will get them into consumers' hands quicker, but may not make the price any better, a pricing and marketing researcher has found.

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Tiziana CasciaroProfessor Tiziana Casciaro

The Oscar Curse? Study Says that Oscar Win for Best Actress Increases the Risk of Divorce - January 28, 2011

Will Academy Award nominees Nicole Kidman and Annette Bening be at higher risk for a divorce if they win the Oscar for best actress next month? A long line of best actress winners including Joan Crawford, Bette Davis, Halle Berry and Kate Winslet experienced the end of their marriages not long after taking home their awards.

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Geoffrey LeonardelliProfessor Geoffrey Leonardelli

"Vive la difference!" Seeing foreigners as foreign encourages local coworkers to assist them finds a Rotman study - January 11, 2011

Whether it's a company with local and ex-pat employees, countries in need of aid, or the elderly interacting with the young, a new research paper to be published in the journal Psychological Science says recognizing diversity can actually encourage people to help each other instead of sparking conflict.

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Partha MohanramProfessor Partha Mohanrami

CEOs rewarded for wrong kind of growth, Rotman paper finds - January 04, 2011

Growth is good, right? Not always. But compensation committees still tend to reward CEOs when their companies grow due to investments – even though that has been found to hurt long-term shareholder value – rather than only rewarding growth due to improved profitability, says a paper co-authored by a professor at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management.

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Ideas 2010

Ideas by Year: 2010

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Ideas by Year: 2010

Mark StabileProfessor Mark Stabile

Fatal Flaws Seen in Quebec's Failed Health Deductible Proposal - September 2010

Quebec's government recently withdrew its proposal to impose a form of user fees for healthcare. In a new C.D. Howe Institute Working Paper, "Fatal Flaws: Assessing Quebec's Failed Health Deductible Proposal," health policy experts Mark Stabile, C.D. Howe Fellow-in-Residence and Associate Professor at the Rotman School of Management, and Sevil N-Marandi, a graduate of the School of Public Policy at the University of Toronto, assess Quebec's failed proposal.

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Stéphane CôtéProfessor Stéphane Côté

Leaders of the pack display high EQ, Rotman study finds - September 21, 2010

The ability to understand emotions is a key ingredient in people who become leaders in groups with no formal authority, a new paper has found.

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Oded BermanProfessor Oded Berman

Increased worker flexibility not always a good thing, says new Rotman paper - August 11, 2010

Companies trying to improve efficiency by building more flexibility into their workforce could end up too lean and drive costs up, says a new paper co-published by the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management.

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Claire TsaiProfessor Claire Tsai

No Pain, No Gain? Concrete Thinking Increases Consumer Confidence - August 09, 2010

The confidence you feel when making a choice might depend on whether you’re thinking concretely or abstractly, according to a new study in the Journal of Consumer Research.

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Avi GoldfarbProfessor Avi Goldfarb

Online ads can get too close for comfort - June 14, 2010

Trying to have an impact in the brave new world of web advertising? You could match an ad to a web page’s content – such as putting a car ad on an auto consumer website. Or, you could make it stand out with eye-catching pop-up graphics and video. But don’t waste your marketing budget putting the two strategies together.

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Sarah KaplanProfessor Sarah Kaplan

Love it or hate it, PowerPoint shapes strategy-making, says new Rotman paper - May 26, 2010

It’s been banned as a productivity killer. It’s even been recently criticized by a U.S. military General as “dangerous” for over- simplifying sophisticated problems of warfare. Say what you like about PowerPoint, the computer software that presents business cases like a slide show, but one researcher at the Rotman School says that such critiques ignore the ways the technology is used to shape idea generation and build corporate strategies.

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Paul MassonProfessor Paul Masson

G20 Toronto summit unlikely to achieve major reform, study suggests - May 11, 2010

Coordination of financial regulations makes sense for countries trying to minimize the effects of global financial uncertainty, says a paper from the Rotman School of Management. But the “prospect for effective cooperation is not encouraging,” says the paper, adding the G20’s size “may be a problem.

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Chen-Bo Zhong
Sanford DeVoe

Professor Chen-Bo Zhong, Professor Sanford DeVoe

Fast food exposure can make us impatient - March 25, 2010

Fast food is not only bad for your body, but may also harm your bank account. Eating habits have shifted dramatically over the last few decades--fast food has become a multibillion dollar industry that has widespread influence on what and how we eat.

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Dilip SomanProfessor Dilip Soman

Packing your troubles away actually works says new Rotman paper - March 24, 2010

Finding it hard to get over a failed love interest? Just can't get details of a bad financial move out of your head? A new study from the Rotman School of Management suggests you might want to stick something related to your disappointment in a box or envelope if you want to feel better.

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Chen-Bo Zhong
Vanessa Bohns

Professor Chen-Bo Zhong, Professor Vanessa Bohns

Darkness Increases Dishonest Behaviour - March 01, 2010

Psychological scientists and Rotman Professors Chen-Bo Zhong, Vanessa Bohns, along with Francesca Gino of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, conducted three experiments to test whether darkness can license dishonest and self-interested behaviours.

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Jeffrey CallenProfessor Jeffrey Callen

Earnings help predict the price of credit default swaps - January 04, 2010

Overexposure to credit default swaps (CDS) – a market-traded form of investment insurance – are believed to have contributed to last year’s financial meltdown. Trying to understand how CDS prices are determined, a team of researchers concludes that earnings have a major impact and in turn, CDS prices can seriously affect the economy.

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Rotman Magazine

Rotman Management

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Rotman Management

"Edgy and
Unconventional Wisdom"

Rotman Management magazine, published tri-annually by the Rotman School of Management, features the latest in global business thinking. Contributors include Rotman faculty, faculty from the world’s top business schools, business leaders, and thought leaders from a variety of arenas including design, behavioural economics and psychology. Rotman students and alumni get a lifetime subscription to the magazine, in print or digital format. 


What People Are Saying About Rotman Management

"Rotman Management is a phenomenal publication if you’re a fan of edgy and unconventional wisdom."
- Matthew E. May, Founder, EDIT Innovation & Author, The Shibumi Strategy, In Pursuit of Elegance, & The Elegant Solution

“If everyone reasons the same way, everyone will come to the same conclusions. There are a handful of non-traditional business magazines that you may want to review to gain a fresh viewpoint. [One] that is worth a look is Rotman Management, which devotes its pages to a slightly different take on the big issues of the day."
- Paul B. Brown in the Conference Board Review (New York, NY)



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Rotman Management Magazine

Quote_Inventors_Roger Martin

In this Rotman Management magazine article titled 'User Driven Innovation: Putting an End to Inventing in the Dark', Roger Martin and James Milway discuss that to spur greater prosperity, we need to fundamentally rethink how we invest in innovation. 
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Quote_Illusions_Mihnea Moldoveanu

In this Rotman Management magazine article titled 'Necessary Illusions and Dangerous Delusions', Mihnea Moldoveanu discusses ways to avoid biases by taking an 'outside view' of things. 
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Quote_StateofMind_Matthew May

Matthew E. May discusses how taking and making breaks are essential components of optimal thinking in the Rotman Management article 'The Neuroscience of Change: How to Reset Your Brain'.
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Quote_Working Norm_Derek Dean

'Recovering from Information Overload', article written by Caroline Webb and Derek Dean in Rotman Management, discusses how multitasking is not the answer to the endless influx of information. Instead, we must focus, filter and forget.
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Quote_Current Assumptions_David Wann

David Wann makes an argument that it's time to stop seeing the world as it is, and to begin seeing it as it could be in this Rotman Management article titled 'The New Normal: An Agenda for Responsible Living'.
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Quote_Concept Design_Johannes Seemann

'Hybrid Insights: Where the Quantitative Meets the Qualitative', article written by Johannes Seeman in Rotman Management, discusses how placing an individual's needs in the context of a 'peer set' enables human-centered solutions that scale. 
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Quote_Neuroscience_Matthew May

Matthew E. May discusses how taking and making breaks are essential components of optimal thinking in the Rotman Management article 'The Neuroscience of Change: How to Reset Your Brain'.
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Watch some of our latest New Thinking: Visitors to Rotman videos. You can watch all of our New Thinking: Visitors to Rotman videos on our Youtube channel.


Speaker Series

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Speaker Series

Throughout the year, some of the greatest minds in business visit the Rotman School to share their insights in our ongoing suite of Speakers Series. Here are some of the exciting visitors we've had lately. To see a listing of upcoming Speaker Series events, visit our Upcoming Events listing.

FRED DAWKINS

TO VIEW A VIDEO OF THIS EVENT CLICK HERE>>

DON TAPSCOTT

ZHANG JUNSAI


RANDI ZUCKERBERG

MALCOLM GLADWELL

JOHN WOOD

TO VIEW A VIDEO OF THIS EVENT CLICK HERE>>

Life Long Learning

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Life Long Learning

Rotman's annual 1-day intensive conference features some of the greatest minds in management thinking. This year's theme is Thinking about Thinking. Register Today

Life Long Learning 2014

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Ken McGuffin

Manager, Media Relations
Rotman School of Management
Voice – 416-946-3818
E-Mail – mcguffin@rotman.utoronto.ca