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Michael-Lee Chin Family Institute for Corporate Citizenship
Michael-Lee Chin Family Institute for Corporate Citizenship

The Michael Lee-Chin Family Institute for Corporate Citizenship

The focal point for corporate citizenship and sustainability initiatives at Rotman

The Lee-Chin Institute's purpose is to help current and future business leaders integrate corporate citizenship into business strategy and practices by actively developing and disseminating useful research, tools and curricula.

What's new 

  • 2015 Fellows of the Lee-Chin Institute announced. Fellows of the Lee-Chin Institute are chosen to support and honour their work relating to corporate citizenship for a one-year term. This year's fellows are:    

    • Alexander Dyck (Professor of Finance and Business Economics and ICPM Professor in Pension Management), a distinguished senior Rotman scholar and teacher whose primary work for the Institute is the project “Do Institutional Owners Drive Adoption of Corporate Social Responsibility?” exploring whether institutional ownership has played a causal role in driving firm adoption of increased environmental and social governance.

    • András Tilcsik (Assistant Professor of Strategic Management), a rising scholar and teacher at Rotman whose work for the Institute includes two projects: first, “Environmental Catastrophes: Prevention and Mitigation” to identify corporate practices and decision-making processes that reduce the risk and impact of environmental disasters; and second, “Remedies for Employment Discrimination” to provide practical advice on how organizations can ensure equal opportunity in their hiring.  

  • 2015 Lee-Chin Institute grants supporting research in corporate citizenship by Rotman faculty and PhDs announced:    
    • Andrew Ching (Associate Professor of Marketing) and Jinghui Qian (PhD Candidate, Marketing), “The Role of Corporate Social Responsibility Activities in Retail Chain Expansion: Evidence from Walmart.”

    • Laura Doering (Assistant Professor of Strategic Management) and Sarah Thebaud (Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of California at Santa Barbara), on “Beyond Relational Lending: Interpersonal Ties and Gender Expectations in Commercial Microfinance.”

    • Carlos Inoue (PhD Candidate, Strategy) and Anita McGahan (Rotman Chair in Management and Professor of Strategic Management, “Law and Sentiment: Privatization of Public Services in the US 1992-2012.” 

    • Nan Li (Assistant Professor of Accounting, UTS/Rotman), “Corporate Social Responsibility and Wage Differential.”

    • Hadiya Roderique (PhD Candidate, Organizational Behaviour & HR Management) and Tiziana Casciaro (Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior and HR Management), “Improving the Selection of the ‘Other’: An Examination of the Barriers to Female Mentorship in Corporate Organizations.”

    • Wally Smieliauskas (Professor of Accounting) and Wuyang Zhao (PhD Candidate, Accounting),  “Do Same-Sex Marriage Laws Benefit LGBT Friendly Companies?”

    • Jin Wan (PhD Candidate, Marketing) and Pankaj Aggarwal (Associate Professor of Marketing, UTSC/Rotman), “To Trace is to Trust: Consumers’ Response to Product Traceability.”

  • Roger Martin discusses the growth of income inequality as talent drives the U.S. economy on "Bloomberg Surveillance," Bloomberg Business, March 18, 2015 

  • Roger Martin in Ashley Renders' "A Force for Good" review in Corporate Knights, March 17, 2015

  • Rotman team wins Hult Prize semi-finals in Dubai; headed to global finals as part of final 6 teams for $1 million, Kheleej Times, March 17, 2015

  • Roger Martin interviewed in Ashley Renders' article "Why financial reform isn't enough to restore the public's faith in capitalism" in Corporate Knights, March 6, 2015  

  • Rod Lohin appointed to Lee-Chin Institute at Rotman, January 1, 2015

  • Alison Kemper and Roger Martin on "Cities are businesses' best allies in the battle against climate change" in The Guardian Sustainable Business, October 14, 2014

Past highlights:

Fixing the Game