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Michael-Lee Chin Family Institute for Corporate Citizenship
Michael-Lee Chin Family Institute for Corporate Citizenship

The Michael Lee-Chin Family Institute for Corporate Citizenship

The focal point for corporate citizenship and sustainability initiatives at Rotman

The Lee-Chin Institute's purpose is to help current and future business leaders integrate sustainability into business strategy and practices by actively developing and disseminating useful research, tools and curricula.

What's new 

  • 2015 Fellows of the Lee-Chin Institute announced April 17, 2015. Fellows of the Lee-Chin Institute are chosen to support and honour their work relating to corporate citizenship for a one-year term. This year's fellows are:    

    • Alexander Dyck (Professor of Finance and Business Economics and ICPM Professor in Pension Management), a distinguished senior Rotman scholar and teacher whose primary work for the Institute is the project “Do Institutional Owners Drive Adoption of Corporate Social Responsibility?” exploring whether institutional ownership has played a causal role in driving firm adoption of increased environmental and social governance.

    • András Tilcsik (Assistant Professor of Strategic Management), a rising scholar and teacher at Rotman whose work for the Institute includes two projects: first, “Environmental Catastrophes: Prevention and Mitigation” to identify corporate practices and decision-making processes that reduce the risk and impact of environmental disasters; and second, “Remedies for Employment Discrimination” to provide practical advice on how organizations can ensure equal opportunity in their hiring.  

  • 2015 Lee-Chin Institute grants supporting research in corporate citizenship by Rotman faculty and PhDs announced:    
    • Andrew Ching (Associate Professor of Marketing) and Jinghui Qian (PhD Candidate, Marketing), “The Role of Corporate Social Responsibility Activities in Retail Chain Expansion: Evidence from Walmart.”

    • Laura Doering (Assistant Professor of Strategic Management) and Sarah Thebaud (Assistant Professor of Sociology, University of California at Santa Barbara), on “Beyond Relational Lending: Interpersonal Ties and Gender Expectations in Commercial Microfinance.”

    • Carlos Inoue (PhD Candidate, Strategy) and Anita McGahan (Rotman Chair in Management and Professor of Strategic Management, “Law and Sentiment: Privatization of Public Services in the US 1992-2012.” 

    • Nan Li (Assistant Professor of Accounting, UTS/Rotman), “Corporate Social Responsibility and Wage Differential.”

    • Hadiya Roderique (PhD Candidate, Organizational Behaviour & HR Management) and Tiziana Casciaro (Associate Professor of Organizational Behavior and HR Management), “Improving the Selection of the ‘Other’: An Examination of the Barriers to Female Mentorship in Corporate Organizations.”

    • Wally Smieliauskas (Professor of Accounting) and Wuyang Zhao (PhD Candidate, Accounting),  “Do Same-Sex Marriage Laws Benefit LGBT Friendly Companies?”

    • Jin Wan (PhD Candidate, Marketing) and Pankaj Aggarwal (Associate Professor of Marketing, UTSC/Rotman), “To Trace is to Trust: Consumers’ Response to Product Traceability.”

  • Roger Martin discusses the growth of income inequality as talent drives the U.S. economy on "Bloomberg Surveillance," Bloomberg Business, March 18, 2015 

  • Roger Martin in Ashley Renders' "A Force for Good" review in Corporate Knights, March 17, 2015

  • Rotman team wins Hult Prize semi-finals in Dubai; headed to global finals as part of final 6 teams for $1 million, Kheleej Times, March 17, 2015

  • Roger Martin interviewed in Ashley Renders' article "Why financial reform isn't enough to restore the public's faith in capitalism" in Corporate Knights, March 6, 2015  

  • Rod Lohin appointed to Lee-Chin Institute at Rotman, January 1, 2015

  • Alison Kemper and Roger Martin on "Cities are businesses' best allies in the battle against climate change" in The Guardian Sustainable Business, October 14, 2014

Past highlights:

Fixing the Game