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Scott A. Hawkins

Scott Hawkins

Associate Professor of Marketing

Degrees:

PhD, Carnegie Mellon University
MS, Carnegie Mellon University
BA, Northwestern University

Phone:

416-978-4196

Bio

Scott Hawkins is an Associate Professor of Marketing at Rotman. His research interests focus on consumer behavior and advertising effectiveness, and he is particularly interested in the heuristics consumers employ to cope with complex information. Scott teaches MBA and undergraduate courses in Consumer Behaviour and Branding. His research has been published in Journal of Consumer Research, Journal of Consumer Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Psychological Bulletin, Journal of Experimental Psychology: Human Perception and Performance, and Journal of Experimental Social Psychology. Prior to Rotman, Scott has taught at the University of Chicago, the University of Iowa, and Carnegie Mellon University.

Academic Positions

  • 1998-Present

    Associate Professor of Marketing, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

  • 1993-1998

    Assistant Professor of Marketing, Rotman School of Management, University of Toronto

  • 1989-1993

    Assistant Professor of Marketing, Graduate Business School, University of Chicago

  • 1988-1989

    Instructor in Marketing, Graduate School of Business, University of Chicago

  • 1987-1988

    Instructor in Marketing, Graduate School of Industrial Administration, Carnegie Mellon University

  • 1987

    Instructor in Social Sciences, Carnegie Mellon University

Selected Publications - Papers

Selected Publications - Books and Chapters

  • Advertising Repetition and Consumer Beliefs: The Role of Source Memory

    with S. Law in B. Wells (Ed.)

    Measuring Advertising Effectiveness

    1997

Research and Teaching Interests

I currently teach courses in Consumer Behaviour and Branding in the MBA and Commerce Programs. My research interests focus on consumer behavior and advertising effectiveness. I am particularly interested in the heuristics consumers employ to cope with complex information. Specific issues include: choice architecture and moral decision making, mechanisms by which consumers form beliefs about products, response mode effects in consumer preference elicitation, the role of memory processes in judgment strategies, and hindsight biases that occur when consumers look back on previous experiences and try to learn from them.

Honors and Awards

  • 2006-2017

    Commerce Excellence in Teaching Award, University of Toronto Rotman School of Management

  • 1998, 2003, 2007-2008, 2010-2017

    MBA Excellence in Teaching Award, University of Toronto Rotman School of Management

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